1910s

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The Founding

Against the background of the Mexican Revolution and a world war, El Paso gets its institution of higher leaning: The Texas State School of Mines and Metallurgy.

Contents

1910

The University of Texas in Austin admits the last class into its mining engineering course, winding down the program.

1912

Arizona and New Mexico are admitted to the United States.

1913

The El Paso Military Institute graduates its last class and enters receivership, closing after only five years.

April
16 - The 33rd State Legislature approves the founding of a school of mining at metallurgy in El Paso, provided the residents purchase the land formerly owned by the El Paso Military Institute and deed the property over to the State for use by the new school.

1914

April
The April issue of National Geographic Magazine features an article on the architecture of Bhutan.

13 - Local businesses in El Paso guarantee a funding note in the amount of $50,000 toward the establishment of a school of mines.

28 - The Board of Regents formally establish the State School of Mines and Metallurgy. Steve H. Worrell is named the school's first dean.

30 - The School of Mines (now referred to unofficially as TSM, or Texas School of Mines) takes possession of the El Paso Military Institute property.

September
23 - On a site that is now part of Fort Bliss, northeast of El Paso, the State School of Mines and Metallurgy officially opens for student registration.

28 - Twenty-one students are present at the State School of Mines and Metallurgy for the first day of classes. The first cohort would eventually total 27 students.

December
7 - TSM students hold their first dance in the auditorium of the main building.

1915

October
22 - TSM's football team, the Miners, wins its first game, defeating the 4th Artillery (Fort Bliss), 13-6.

December
6 - The Scientific Club holds its first meeting.

1916

March
9 - Pancho Villa crosses the border into the United States and raids Columbus, New Mexico.

May
30 - TSM awards its first mining engineering degrees to three students: Vere Leasure, Lloyd Nelson, and Clyde Ney. The ceremonies are held in the main building's auditorium with Rabbi Martin Zielonka giving the commencement address.

September
TSM admits its first female students, Ruth Brown and Grace Odell.

October
29 - A devastating fire destroys the Main Building in the early morning hours.

November
2 - Less than five days after a fire destroys the main building, TSM announces that it would relocate the entire school and sell the land to the U.S. Army for the enlargement of Fort Bliss. (It would take twenty-five years to complete the transaction.)

1917

January
The 35th State Legislature approves the dispersal of $100,000 in emergency funds for the construction of new buildings at TSM.

February
TSM and El Paso residents discuss expanding the course offerings of the school to include a junior college and teacher preparation.

March
22 - First meeting of the directorate to combine TSM with the proposed city college.

April
2 - The United States enters World War I.

May
2 - The College of the City of El Paso is incorporated.

7 - Title is conveyed to 22 acres of land located on the Franklin Mountains for TSM's new home.

September
TSM begins its 1917-1918 year offering classes in conjunction with the new College of the City of El Paso. Females now make up one-half of the school's enrollment.

English, history, and modern language classes are offered for the first time.

Ruth Monro Augur is appointed registrar.

1918

January
The new buildings on the Franklin Mountain campus host their first classes.

April
The new buildings on the Franklin Mountain campus are formally dedicated.

May
The Class of 1918, consisting solely of T.M. Prettyman, graduates.

1919

The Board of Regents and the 36th State Legislature designate TSM the "Department of Mines and Metallurgy of the University of Texas," and henceforth is to be considered a "branch" of the University of Texas. Students and locals still refer to the school as "TSM."

February
The Prospector, after a hiatus, resumes publication with Volume 1, Number 1.

Students form the first Student Association on campus.

April
Ruth Monro Augur, the schools' registrar, designs TSM's first seal. It features the head of a spade with a burro set against it.

30 - Formal title to the Franklin Mountain site is conveyed to the Board of Regents.

May
31 - The Class of 1919 graduates five students with each receiving a B.S. degree in mining and metallurgy.

September
TSM begins the new academic year with new admission requirements that align with the Austin campus.


Sources: Fugate, Frontier College (1964); The Prospector; UTEP Special Collections; UT Austin Briscoe Center

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